Monthly Archives of: August 2019

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Einstein, Spacetime, and the Fallacious Belief in a Central Ego…

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Hermann Minkowski and Albert Einstein taught us about how space and time are not two entirely different things but are, together, one.  However, most people just do not get what that means, psychologically and fundamentally, including a lot of supposedly smart scientists.  Years ago, when i was much younger, i used to hang around the quantum physicist Professor David Bohm, whom Einstein fondly called his “spiritual son.”  Bohm was a famous scientist in his own right and when we discussed things, i was already well aware of the implications of spacetime and what that meant psychologically and on a larger scale.

Space and time are not two separate entities; together they are one.  If you look at nature and people merely with psychological separation, with psychological space, as most people do, that very separation helps to support and produce an abstracted, psychological “I” or “me.”  If you perceived without such (learned) separation, the “I” or “me” need not exist (which would be fundamentally way more accurate).  If you say, “I will be trying to be ‘good’ so that I can eventually get to heaven,” you are supposing that you are something separate from time (in time)… rather than the actuality of being what time is.   Your brain consists of matter (which often functions to react as thoughts), and matter is space, spacetime.   Of course, we have to use time (in the physical world) to get to work on time or to be at a specified meeting on time.  To use time to get somewhere psychologically or spiritually, however, is largely fallacious.   Wishing to advance over time spiritually presupposes that you are “in time” and are not what “time is.”  Mentally manufacturing a separation between you and time (except for certain time-oriented physical things, like the ones mentioned… and for using our crude, unfortunate language system) is often a process of wasting energy and is inviting great deception.  Both the aforementioned psychological space separation and the psychological time separation are illusory; together, both help to create the fallacious and selfishly separate ego.  (One cannot be in communion with the timeless if one is a series of fragments of time that erroneously presuppose that they are “in time” advancing spiritually.)

Eternal and orderly phenomena can exist (in humans) without the ego (i.e., without any psychological center).  As we have often suggested, the central ego is essentially fallacious and illusory.  Habitually looking from (and “as”) it is an illusion; it is a fallacy that most people habitually cling to.  Like a man who thinks that he sees vast water in a desert — you know that age-old mirage — and insists on fishing in it non-stop, stay completely with the ego if you wish.

When discussing things in public with people, we can still politely use the word “I,” while (all the while) being fully aware of its fallacious and deceiving attributes; it is one of the misfortunes of living in a society with a barbaric system of language.  Professor Bohm diligently worked on helping develop a more accurate and scientifically evolved system of language, which he called the Rheomode.  Later in life, Bohm learned of the Native American Blackfoot language, and also of other members of this Native American language family, all of which are very strongly verb-based and do not divide the world into solid categories (i.e., nouns) but, instead, describe in terms of processes and related movements.   Link to short Professor David Bohm Video.

 

 

Green Treehopper … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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Wordless Wednesday … Not!

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?what kind of heathen sacrilegiously writes
on a consecrated,wordless day,
asking us to transcend all of our mindless traditions 

 

 


[Note:  Today’s posting was inspired by a comment by a wonderful blogger that i follow who, last Wednesday, in a “Wordless Wednesday” that i posted, graciously commented that my words were missed.  Thank you much, A Curious Introvert !  … and hugs to Cutie Fuzzy Doggy.]

Let’s follow Daddy-Long-Legs … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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Trying to Get to the Top

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                                                                 O
                                                                 h $

                                                               that
                                                           top that
                                                       so many are
                                                   struggling to get to

                               Is it worth all of the time & competition?
      Is surpassing and suppressing those below and impressing those above worth it?
When you finally get to the top, is there really genuine happiness there or is it an empty lie?!

 

 

Getting to the Top … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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Our Neural Networks and the fallacious “I”…

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Our neural networks — much like a computer — are hardwired and conditioned to accept and fully believe in a central (free-will oriented) regulatory  agent whom we call “I.”  This “I” to each of us, seems very concrete, dependable (i.e., always there to control), and stable.  We never deeply question whether such a “center” really exists in the first place.  I maintain that there is no legitimate “I,” which, of course, seems contradictory, (due to the crude structure and barbaric evolutionary phase of our current language system).  

When one talks to people about there being no “I” they tend to feel rather apprehensive, threatened, and psychologically uncomfortable.  After all, to them, one is threatening the very core of their psychological framework.  Our physical body, the organism, perceives largely through the eyes.  The eye tends to be what focuses on and examines things.  A similitude exists in us (mentally) between the physical “eye” and our concept of the “I” of the mind.  We say that the “I” examines; we say that the “I” perceives; we say it was decided by “me.”  The brain’s associative patterns are, in pretty much everyone, deeply hardwired and conditioned to constantly be referring to and depending upon this “I.”  (The physiology of the brain is much like a walnut, and scientists have — repeatedly,  in different human individuals — surgically divided the two halves, producing two separate fields of consciousness in each skull, each permanently existing with no clue as to what the other half is thinking.) Our conditioning for so many mental things is deeply pre-programmed in us, and many factors, including physical health, past education, brain chemistry, and genetic influences, pretty much nullify any real “free-will” completely, whether we like it or not.  We must act — not react — carefully and diligently, and we cannot do that if we believe in a lot of crap that isn’t true.  In 1932, Albert Einstein told the Spinoza society:
“Human beings in their thinking, feeling, and acting are not free
but are as causally bound as the stars in their motions.”

What we are saying is that this “I,” in a tremendous way, is fallacious and unnecessary.  Clinging to it is like clinging to that childhood Raggy Ann Doll that was mentioned years ago in one of my earlier blogs… clinging to it as if it was real, alive, and a dependable pal.  We could live perfectly, compassionately, and timelessly without clinging to our fallacious “I”s.  Scientists, as was mentioned before in my blogging, have suggested that our universe likely operates in a totally different way than what we think is happening now… and they, the writer maintains, are correct.  It was, many years ago, when i understood the fictitiousness of the “I” and the foolhardiness of the concept of “free-will,” when real security, profundity, insight into eternity, and real order came… (and not before).

This life is relatively short — in the few years that we have to live — and if you don’t get it right, via understanding and insight, if you (instead) continue to cling to a lot of rotten, crude fallacies, then the consequences are eternal (and not nearly as sweet as they could be).   There is great beauty and timeless splendor in life if life is seen without much illusion.  

 

 

Neural Networks or maybe just Queen Anne’s Lace … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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So here we are, Master FourEyes

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So here we are, Master FourEyes,
and i don’t think that what i write
will change things enough

and i don’t think that what you
nibble on will change things enough
… and that’s OK; it’s OK

And when we look at each other
each other we are
And when each other
we together look at oneself

Our unbelievable now is more timeless 
than any dead(stone-cold temple that replaced the prairies)
while Mr. Death — whom so many fear — has nothing on us

because we livingly understand him(and smile with and beyond him)
more than teardrops grow upwards
and flowers flow down

 

 

Master FourEyes… who happens to be a Milkweed Beetle on, of all places, a Milkweed Plant … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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There is the isn’t

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There is the isn’t 
which every couldn’t lost for                   
Its unquietness is what we were
and its non-absence steals our wonder

This is the joy(quite possible
that)every sorrow would ignore
Its murmuring is beyond our getting
and its thunder beyond your clapping

 

 

Tiny White-Striped Katydid on a Clover Leaf … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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Insights or Non- (Part 11)

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The comatoseness of the average-ordinary mind is the result of a cadaverous education.

Merely looking at life through a screen of symbols and labels — as most do — isn’t really looking at life at all.

Taking a shower isn’t good enough; cleanse yourself of the dusty, stale past.

One cannot be visited by that pristine ground of eternal sacredness unless one’s mind is of intense order and purity.

There is, despite what we were taught, no (real) separate ego or central “I” controlling thought/thinking; what occurs — other than what holistic insight and direct perception reveal — is mostly all conditioned reactions that one is not separate from.  

Being photogenic isn’t important.  Being whole, compassionate, and perceptive is important.

 

 

After a Shower … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

 

 

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Finally meeting your Long Lost Auntie

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Yes, dears, I am your long lost auntie.
We finally get to meet, my sweet loved ones!
Life’s been tough, as you can see by all of the 
many timeworn scratches on my aged back.  
Come, come, I have some sweet, fresh salad for you to enjoy!
You had better eat it while it’s fresh…
that way, you will get all of the best vitamins that will help you grow.
Eat plenty, eat!

After we eat, that is when
your loving auntie will hug you dearly.
We’ll hug and hug to make up for all of the lost time that
has befallen us.
Now, let’s eat, dearies, let’s eat!  

 

 

Photo of Your Long Lost Auntie … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

 

 

 

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I Had a Pet Frog (named Infinitum) but He Croaked… This Poem is Dedicated to Him…

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AD INFINITUM                                                        😦

 

My wonderful, magnificent
pet frog croaked, and i was very sad.
The next day, he was quite alive,
and i was very happy.
But then, my wonderful, magnificent 
pet frog croaked, and i was very sad.
The next day, he was quite alive,
and i was very happy.  
But then, my wonderful, magnificent 
pet frog croaked, and i was very sad.
The next day, he was quite alive,
and i was very happy.  
But then, my wonderful, magnificent 
pet frog croaked, and i was very sad.
The next day, he was quite alive,
and i was very happy.  
But then, my wonderful, magnificent 
pet frog croaked, and i was very sad.
The next day, he was quite alive,
and i was very happy.
But then, my wonderful, magnificent
pet frog croaked, and i was very sad.
The next day, he was quite alive,
and i was very happy.
But then, my wonderful, magnificent
pet frog croaked, and i was very sad.
The next day, he was quite alive,
and i was very happy.
But then, my wonderful, magnificent
pet frog croaked, and i was very sad.
The next day, he was quite alive,
and i was very happy.
But then, my wonderful, magnificent
pet frog croaked, and i was very sad.
The next day, he was quite alive,
and i was very happy.  

Ad Infinitum…                                                                🙂 

 

 

My Eastern Gray Tree Frog named Infinitum … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

 

 

 

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on Experience

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Experience… what is it, and why do we exclusively depend upon it?  A lot of people say, “I’ve learned from experience”; or they say, “I will learn from my experiences.”  Many people go on expensive and lengthy vacations to far distant places to get “exotic experiences.”

Experiencing has its place.  However, it is very limited.  Many crave “new” experiences… but are such experiences — all based on patterns of recognition — really all that “new”?  I am suggesting that fundamentally, intrinsically, they are all very much the same and are not really so “new”; they all depend on — and add to — patterns within the field of the mundane known.  (That is why many of us retain a deep, inherent sadness, even though we travel to places that should seem new and exciting.  Merely existing as a brain that is based primarily on patterns and the recognition of patterns… is sorrow.  But that is what most of us were trained to exist as.)  Most of us were brainwashed to crave various “wonderful” experiences (i.e., more and more experiences)… through commercials, magazines, examples in books, and by what friends and relatives say and do.  (Experiences are never enough, though, because they are essentially limited.  But nobody tells you that.)

Evading experience (on the other hand) can be a very childish thing, wherein one endlessly sits cross-legged, for example, thinking that one is accomplishing something special.  (You know… all that phony so-called meditation stuff, which is really a glorified form of self-hypnosis.)

Is the experiencer all so separate from what the experience is?  If one examines intelligently, the answer is rather obvious: “No.”  We look with (and “as”) accumulated patterns and labels at things, pigeonhole them in the rather musty memory bank system and call the experience “new.”  To really see something new, perception itself must be dynamically new, fundamentally different, and not based on old, stale systems (and patterns) of observation.  Most people are incapable of that, and you don’t get it by sitting in a corner with your legs crossed.  Additionally, you don’t get it by reading traditional so-called “religious” books that have been severely distorted over time.  

There is a deep, orderly intelligence that is a true spiritual blossoming that is beyond the thoughts and fabrications of man… beyond all of the rituals, stone temples, and concocted patterns.  (Those fabrications are all old, and the timeless, miraculous new does not dwell as them.)  Deep intelligence is a dynamic harmony, a deep order that effortlessly flows between experiencing and going beyond experiencing.  (Constant experiencing and “accumulating” only builds up the illusion of the self.)  The “going beyond experiencing” factor (or dimension) is never planned or mentally arranged for.  Deep, spontaneous newness and dynamic creativity are never part of a plan or contrived methodology.

 

 

Wildflower Pods … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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Monarch Caterpillar

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In my beginning is my end.  — T.S. Eliot

 

 


[Note:   While photographing this Monarch caterpillar, it noticed the camera and suddenly went from high activity and movement to total stillness.  More of us would be better off by letting total stillness — of the mind — occur more often (even though it is not merely an occurrence and has nothing to do with time or effort).] 

 

 

Monarch Caterpillar … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

 

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Two Short Stories

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Once there was a very rich man who, every time he saw people in need, would quickly pass them by, saying, “Sorry, I don’t help strangers.”
Then, over a short span of time, the man lost everything.  When he reached out for help, the first person who passed him by mumbled, “Sorry, I don’t help strangers.”

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

There was a man who, every time he looked up, worried about what was down…  and every time he looked down, worried about what was up. 
He suddenly died.
They buried him way down in the ground, facing up of course.  

 


 

Monarch Butterfly on Cone Flower … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ReBlog of a KenneTurner Blog: It Can Happen Here: Revisited — Becoming is Superior to Being

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Originally posted on charles french words reading and writing: Given the horrors of the mass shootings over the weekend, clearly inspired by bigotry, white nationalism, and racism, I decided to use this post again. (https://en.wikipedia.org) In 1935, Sinclair Lewis, in It Can’t Happen Here, spoke to the idea that many Americans held that fascism could…

via It Can Happen Here: Revisited — Becoming is Superior to Being

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Pseudo-alive

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A kind of postmortem examination
was done on him
long before his actual physical death

because unfortunately,
his brain became quite un-alive
after the innocent age of childhood.

Miseducation, brainwashing commercials,
propaganda-oriented news networks,
and being satisfied with remaining
in one dull routine after another

all contributed to his cadaverous pseudo-existence.
He often watches television and, of course, likes sports.
However, the little birds who nest in his yard
have far more compassion and life than he ever did.

 

 

Red House Finch Eggs … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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Latest Sierra Club News

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Earth’s glaciers are shrinking five times faster than they were in the 1960s.

The United States used more energy in 2018 than ever before, partly because Americans drove more: 3.225 trillion miles, 12.2 billion more than 2017.

Wolves return to the Netherlands after an absence of 140 years.

A suspected rhino poacher in South Africa is trampled to death by an elephant, then eaten by lions.

The last time Earth’s atmosphere had as much carbon dioxide as it does today, there were trees growing near the South Pole.

Thawing ice on Alaska’s Denali is exposing the 66 tons of feces left by generations of mountain climbers.

Sea level rise has cost property owners on the East and Gulf Coasts more than $16 billion since 2005.

Senator Mike Lee of Utah says that the solution to climate change is to “fall in love, get married, and have some kids.”

Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swede who inspired the Youth Climate Strike, is nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

The stomachs of dead whales found in the Philippines and Italy are full of plastic trash.

Scientists discover a new species of orca of southern Chile — “The largest undescribed animal left on the planet.”

Trump’s proposed federal budget would cut funding for the Environmental Protection Agency by 31 percent.

Composite photographer Nick Brandt, whose profound works show how nature in the world is quickly dying away due to man’s indifference, says, “My motivation is my anger and despair at what we are losing, that the human race is sleepwalking its way to oblivion.”

 

 

Lacewing Insect … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019