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Latest Sierra Club News

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Earth’s glaciers are shrinking five times faster than they were in the 1960s.

The United States used more energy in 2018 than ever before, partly because Americans drove more: 3.225 trillion miles, 12.2 billion more than 2017.

Wolves return to the Netherlands after an absence of 140 years.

A suspected rhino poacher in South Africa is trampled to death by an elephant, then eaten by lions.

The last time Earth’s atmosphere had as much carbon dioxide as it does today, there were trees growing near the South Pole.

Thawing ice on Alaska’s Denali is exposing the 66 tons of feces left by generations of mountain climbers.

Sea level rise has cost property owners on the East and Gulf Coasts more than $16 billion since 2005.

Senator Mike Lee of Utah says that the solution to climate change is to “fall in love, get married, and have some kids.”

Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swede who inspired the Youth Climate Strike, is nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

The stomachs of dead whales found in the Philippines and Italy are full of plastic trash.

Scientists discover a new species of orca of southern Chile — “The largest undescribed animal left on the planet.”

Trump’s proposed federal budget would cut funding for the Environmental Protection Agency by 31 percent.

Composite photographer Nick Brandt, whose profound works show how nature in the world is quickly dying away due to man’s indifference, says, “My motivation is my anger and despair at what we are losing, that the human race is sleepwalking its way to oblivion.”

 

 

Lacewing Insect … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

 

 

 

36 Comments Join the Conversation

  1. Mr. Brandt (whose name is a species of bird; karma?) sums it up well. Despair is an accurate description. I am looking to see every day as if it were the last. To hear every coyote call and red-winged blackbird song as if they were the last. My philosophy of this perspective had previously been an based on my own timeline and imminent demise, to appreciate all that is before me before my time is up.
    Nowadays, it seems I am outliving other species at an alarming rate, and must focus my appreciations on things that will be gone before we know it. Already, I can tell my grandchildren that there were, quite literally, three times as many birds of dozens of species when I was a child.
    There has been some awakening, as of late, and there have been small wins and victories for the planet.
    I fear it may be too little, too late, and all the science couldn’t possibly understand and predict the exponential effects of one area on another as regards our planetary and atmospheric decline.
    In “The Jetsons”, there are no trees or birds.
    A cartoon predicts our future.

    Take care,

    Paz

    Reply

  2. I fear matters will have to get much worse before “we” wake up to reality and change dramatically our lifestyles and priorities. Good to have a list like this flashed into awareness for some of “we” if not all just yet.
    Gorgeous photo!

    Reply

  3. If it weren’t so sad, some of this would be almost funny. We’re all just another Nero – fiddling while the world burns.

    Reply

  4. “It’s Good News Week!” Climate change in a hand-basket, This needs to be tattooed into our leaders minds.

    Reply

  5. Three days ago when this post published we could have disdain for man’s indifference to Mother Earth – today, sadly it is man’s indifference to one another. Thank goodness for this lovely lacewing insect to put things into perspective.

    Reply

      • Yes we do Tom – I turn on the news as soon as I get up every morning and I really should not be shocked or horrified by anything I hear anymore. I heard a sad news story about Greenland that scientists worry and obsess over the climate change on the LAND, but no one worries about the people who lives there. The people are having to euthanize their sled dogs because there is not enough snow to be able to use them through the seasons. No one cares about the impact on the people … made me feel sad to hear that.

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