Gazing Leafhopper... there are over 20,000 species of leafhopper worldwide. Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021
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Awareness

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Awareness, in terms of mindfulness and meditation, is not a calculated escape into some kind of fabricated domain beyond what is all around you. The world is largely a big mess right now, chiefly because of man and the disorder that man propagates. The world of nature basically has a beautiful intrinsic order. Awareness perceives this order and also perceives the disorder (primarily involving man). Again, awareness is not some kind of escape into some kind of domain (fabricated by the mind to, supposedly, exist in a utopian, blissful state). Awareness is not sitting with one’s legs in a lotus position, thinking that one is achieving something extraordinary. That is usually a form of self-hypnosis, and there is nothing extraordinary about that.

Deep awareness remains with (and “as”) what is, but that “what is” is not merely the result of what one was molded and trained to see. Merely looking at things through a mental screen of words (which are mere symbols) and isolated images — in a separative, pigeonholing, divisive kind of way — is just a continuation of mindless, limited conditioning and, therefore, is not deep awareness. Deep awareness shatters through stale acceptances, worn-out systems of looking at things, dead traditions, and preconceived iron-clad concepts, and bursts beyond these mere reactions. Deep awareness is not mere reaction, it is action. Deep awareness acts and ends disorder. Again, deep awareness is action, not mere reaction. Deep awareness exists beyond effort; effort is always for a limited goal — in time — and is of reaction. Reaction is mechanical, robotic, rather dead, unalive, ordinary, and it comfortably fits into the current rotten society just fine.

Leafhoppers are not often seen because they are savvy enough to perceive a person approaching them and they subsequently quickly move to a portion of the plant, that they are upon, that is not visible to the oncoming individual. They are very visually and vibrationally perceptive, which is a limited type of awareness.

And while he observed the diminutive insect gazing out from the base of the leaf, there was no immediate labeling, there was no separation between the leaf and his consciousness, there was no separation between the insect and what he was. (They taught him that he was separate, but he didn’t listen.)

Gazing Leafhopper... there are over 20,000 species of leafhopper worldwide. Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021
Gazing Leafhopper… there are over 20,000 species of leafhopper worldwide. Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021

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My Blog primarily consists of close-up nature photos (that I've taken locally) combined with original holistic-truth oriented prose and/or poetry involving mindfulness/awareness. I love nature and I love understanding the whole (not merely the parts and the details). I'm a retired teacher of the multiply handicapped. I have a number of interesting hobbies, such as fossil collecting, sport-kite flying, 3D and 2D close-up photography, holography, and pets. Most of all, I am into holistic self-awareness, spontaneous insight, unconventional observation/direct perception, mindfulness, meditation, world peace, non-fragmentation, population control, vegetarianism, and green energy. To follow my unique Blog of "Nature Photos and Mindfulness Sayings" and for RSS feeds to my new posts, please access at: tom8pie.com (On my regular Blog posting pages, for additional information and to follow, simply click on the "tack icon" at the upper right corner... or, on my profile page, you can click on the "Thomas Peace" icon.) Stay mindful, understanding, and caring!...

18 Comments Join the Conversation

  1. You nail it Tom – “And while he observed the diminutive insect gazing out from the base of the leaf, there was no immediate labeling, there was no separation between the leaf and his consciousness, there was no separation between the insect and what he was.”
    This is awareness as I experience it.
    Why is it so difficult for people to understand this? I know conditioning is powerful but when we open ourselves to the wonders of nature we enter this state without effort – i guess if I was going to try to answer my own question I would say that few take the time…. (even with hoards of people entering the forest or backyard or any ‘wild place’ no matter how small…) to SEE.
    Thank you for this post – and oh, that is the most beautiful picture of a leafhopper that I have ever seen. They are luminesce -don’t they?

    Reply

    • If that is also how your consciousness actually is… wow… that is awesome! 😁

      People don’t understand it because they were miseducated and were instilled with separation and conflict (i.e., disorder). Perceiving with (“as”) disorder usually is like looking through a warped (trick) mirror.

      The internet in my rural area had been out a few days β€” this posting was prescheduled β€” and i apologize for the late reply.

      Leafhoppers come in all colors and rainbows of colors. Their visual perception is amazing. In my previous posting on the jumping spider, if you have time, read the article on jumping spider visual capabilities that pstachowski provided to me in the comments section. Amazing!!! πŸ˜ŠπŸ•·πŸ•·πŸ•·

      Reply

      • Oh will read about the spider!Like you my Internet was down five days week before last – disorienting – I cannot always enter this state – if I am upset or running a mental rat race then no…. But when I am fully present yes… my guess is that you do the same…

  2. Well said, Tom. I agree with your perspective. Leaf hoppers look quite beautiful. I’ve never been able to see one so thank you for the introduction.

    Reply

  3. Leafhoppers are more perceptive than we would think and just as I gazed at that little fella, I thought to myself “I thought they were bright green” and the next thought was “but of course, Tom is close up with his macro lens, so they’d be different shades of green” … aha … then I read the caption: “… there are over 20,000 species of leafhopper worldwide ….” Of course, that explains it, as I’ve only seen the Plain Jane Leafhoppers. πŸ™‚

    Reply

    • Well, Linda, if you’ve seen any Leafhoppers, you are certainly much more on the ball and more perceptive (nature-wise) than are the vast majority of people. Yes, with all of the various species, they come in many different colors, shapes, and sizes. They are very good at avoiding detection from others. 🐝😊

      The internet in my rural area had been out a few days β€” this posting was prescheduled β€” and i apologize for the late reply.

      Reply

      • Yes, I think they are about the size of aphids aren’t they? I hope I’m not confusing them Tom. No worries, I am always behind these days. I hear snowflakes are in the weather forecast for Tuesday. The wind was fierce the other day for us, likely what took your power out.

  4. Beautiful thought-triggering post – I would guess that different humans arouse different levels of danger in various non-human beings. That you would raise less concern than say a typical young adult hiking through the terrain for the sake of working up a sweat. When blessed to be out in Nature, I tend to move slower than usual knowing even so I’m missing a myriad of scenes and beings all around me. I’d like to think the others can sense a gentler inherent nature in me vs. humans-at-large. (I might just be dreaming … but it serves to keep me calm and attentive.)

    Reply

    • It’s wonderful, Jazz, that you are not the rushing-through-things-of-nature type. Far too many trot through the treasures, missing them altogether. Walt Whitman’s associates/friends said that he was as fast a molasses in January. Tee-hee! πŸ˜‰ Yes, there is good reason for that. It may be an inherent blessing!

      The internet in my rural area had been out a few days β€” this posting was prescheduled β€” and i apologize for the late reply.

      Reply

  5. Pingback: Awareness – Nelsapy

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