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Curiosity

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In that last prose piece that was written, profound curiosity was mentioned.  Very many of us, when we were very young, had immense curiosity.  This curiosity was a natural investigation into the nature of things.  This curiosity concomitantly involved a lot of questioning.  Most of us, as we aged — as one can see by observing the adults that one interacts with — have lost a lot of this innate drive to discover; unfortunately, too, the questioning has subsided and (instead) many just (more or less) accept what was poured into them.  Then most look at things the way that they were programmed to look… and they end up fitting in quite nicely.  This “fitting in,” however, can often be equated with stagnation, blind-acceptance, dull mediocrity, and imprisoned, bourgeois mentality.  When the mind merely looks with (and “as”) the accumulated “known,” then one gets very bored, stagnant, dull, and sorrow and depression easily manifest.  Many, unfortunately, have quite cadaverous minds, though they are not yet six feet under.

Real discovery, real learning, (and joy), if one is wise, is endless.  Such learning, such discovery does not involve mere accumulation.  It goes far beyond the mere accumulation of information and beyond the mere reacting (of that accumulation).   Curiosity, if it is deep enough, even questions the parameters, nature, essence, and attributes of the very means by which it probes and discovers.  Such curiosity, if it is deep enough, may even go beyond the tools that were provided (by society) for it to operate (as).  These tools, as can be seen, largely consist of thought and thinking.  Most have heavily relied on (and depended upon) thought in their endeavor to assimilate things and figure things out.  However, here is the rub:  If the tools are limited, if the tools themselves have a propensity toward distortion, if the tools themselves are fragmentary and concocted… then the outcome will (pretty much inevitably) be limited and askew.

It may be that there is a profound learning and a profound curiosity that (together) occur beyond mere accumulation.  Such a movement does not depend upon psychological time nor on what others have poured into one.  Perceiving beyond lines of demarcation, beyond circumscribed parameters of thought, beyond constrained methodology, beyond the norm, takes great care and intelligence.  Yet so many remain in ruts and everlastingly function in (and from) such limitation.  Many will easily claim that they are not in a rut (as they robotically keep digging).

Profound insight, deep intelligence, holistic perception, and real compassion occur when the mind is beyond what a stale, rotten society has dictated.

 

 

 

Curiosity (1) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2018

Curiosity (2) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

39 Comments Join the Conversation

  1. Gorgeous photos. While we usually think of “I love you” as the most powerful “three little words,” I’d nominate “What is that?” as a close second.

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  2. “Let no one when young delay to study philosophy, nor when he is old grow weary of his study. For no one can come too early or too late to secure the health of his soul. … both when young and when old a man must study philosophy, that as he grows old he may be young in blessings through the grateful recollection of what has been, and that in youth he may be old as well, since he will know no fear of what is to come.”
    ~Epicurus

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  3. “Perceiving beyond lines of demarcation, beyond circumscribed parameters … takes great care and intelligence.” I agree intelligence helps … but a healthy uninhibited curiosity coupled with discerning skepticism can be cultivated by ANYone, yielding perception beyond norms. Too often we stifle childish questions — in others and in self.

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  4. Thanks for reminding people to keep their sense of curiosity and joy alive and endless. I try to remember that every day.

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  5. Pingback: Curiosity | Success Inspirers World

  6. Allowing the child-like curiosity, together with adult discernment and questioning, every moment of the day. Nice one Tom, thank you.

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  7. Great writing, great subject and great images using my favorite colors! This has to be my favorite piece today. 🙂
    “Many, unfortunately, have quite cadaverous minds, though they are not yet six feet under.” Love this bit, soooooo true! Thank you.

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  8. Truly beautiful pictures. Inspiring, touching, reminding us that we should be and remain curious as nature itself is. Curious towards life.

    Reply

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