All Posts Tagged ‘peace

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Today is my Birthday, and here’s a little, true story concerning it (that you can unbelieve). Two Photos…

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[First, a few quick notes: 1. Albert Einstein, a vegetarian, and pacifist, had some of the best ideas about how to end all wars. For instance, he advocated countries systematically, in an intelligent and coordinated fashion, exchanging military personal on an equal basis, thereby making invasions into other countries (because of nefarious goals) rather impossible. But people don’t tend to listen to pacifists.
2. Most people just do not see the gravity of certain things, the seriousness of certain important things; they are oblivious, conform and fall in line, and life passes them by… and the many miracles never happen.]
3. This may not have much to do with anything, but here are what i hear as lyrics in the YouTube video of the Dharma for One song, as sung by Jethro Tull (live) at the Isle of Wright Festival. (This song, played in their first album, did not originally have any words/lyrics.)

Dharma, seek and you will find
Truth within your mind, Dharma.
Dharma, each to his own we say,
Together we’ll end our stream, Dharma.
Dharma, mad-time confusion burns,
Seek-money never learns, Dharma.
Truth is like freedom, it doesn’t fool me,
Being true to yourself, never think that you’re free.
Dharma will come eventually, Tao.
Dharma, Dharma…
Dharma, each to his own we sing,
Together we’ll end our stream, Dharma.
_________________________________________________________________________

Today is my birthday. I was born on November 4th, 1951. When i was the age to be eligible to be drafted (or not) concerning the Vietnam war, i was very concerned about what my draft number — according to the U.S.A. Draft Lottery — would be. I was (and still am) a pacifist and was not at all interested in going to war; i am a vegetarian; i don’t even care to contribute to the killing of animals. The lower the draft number that one is assigned, out of 365 (366), the higher the chances of you being drafted. Draft numbers were selected and assigned, via a Draft Lottery, according to your date of birth; the Draft Lottery, which was held to determine the draft status for my age-group, was held on December 1, 1970. So what was my draft number — assigned to my date of birth — after the Draft Lottery was completed? It was 39. I detested that number. I still detest it. It, being a very low number, meant that i definitely would be selected to go to the war. I was very disquieted about my “very draftable” draft number of 39. Circumstances being what they were, i went to college, where a student deferment was applicable. Later, when student deferments were terminated, i had to — because of my low 39 daft number — submit extensive paperwork requesting conscientious objector status.

So, while in college, around the time that i was becoming a vegetarian, i was visiting a friend of mine in his dormitory room. He and i were both avid fishermen; we would often go fishing together (on the weekends). On that particular day, my friend was not feeling well, so he could not go fishing with me (after i had invited him to). Right before i left his room, he gave me — following our brief discussion about music — a large Jethro Tull LP record album that i had never heard or seen before; it was the first album that the group had ever made. Since i liked the group, i thanked him for lending me the album; i left his dormitory room, and put the album on my bed, face up. (I did not look at the back of the album cover.) I went fishing.

I went fishing, alone, at the campus lake. As i fished, i began feeling immensely connected with the fish. One began seeing them as not being separate from what one was. I began seeing their pain as my pain… (or, rather, the “I” was absent and one was everything that was around). Around the same time at the lake, i began feeling like someone or something was watching the fishing; it was a very definite feeling, and i felt very embarrassed to be “seen” fishing (although no one was physically around).

I went back to my dormitory room, without any fish. After a short while, after relaxing a bit, i went over to the record album, that was on my bed, that my friend had given to me, looked at it and (when about to play it) turned it around to look at the back cover. The following is a picture of the album’s back cover. The album, released in the U.S. in February of 1969, is titled “This Was.”

This Was … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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Jumping Spiders and Awareness

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Jumping Spiders, those very alert arachnids, you know, have many eyes.  Some of the eyes are at the back of the head.  Some even have extra eyes on the abdomen (i.e., their rear section).  One of the reasons that they have eyes in such places is so that they can more efficiently see moving prey (that they can capture to eat).  Another reason for having eyes in such places is that other Jumping Spiders (or other spider species or insect enemies) may try to sneak up on them (to devour them).  Seeing such “attackers” affords quick reaction involving countermeasures.  

We might think, “Oh, how very primitive these spiders are, to be attacking and killing each other with such violence.”  Our species, it can be seen, however, still often kill each other on the so-called battlefield.   “Battlefield,” by the way, is just a word or accepted term for where humans go to react ultra-violently (i.e., primitive-ass crazy).  Many of us periodically celebrate those who were the most violent, calling them “great heroes.”  We seldom celebrate — we rarely celebrate — those who were opposed to war.  (We, instead of observing through separative countries, religions, and tribes, need to observe holistically and globally — which would help to end all wars — but most of us won’t do that, because of being firmly and stagnantly stuck in separative ruts.  So the unending nonsense will continue.)  To really go beyond being primitive and violent, we must observe without all of the separations that were poured into us.   

 

 

Jumping Spider Observing … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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What the Finger Said…

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One finger said
to the other finger,
“I want to be close to you!”
The other finger said,
“I feel that we two are
very close.”
Then they passionately wrapped around
each other intertwining.
A somewhat distant finger (away from
the other two) pointedly said,
“You two seem as if you were made for each other!”

Then, after a considerable time, fingers
of a supposedly separate 
hand jealously came attacking,
and total war broke out.

A real fact is that,
in war,
the winners are the losers.  

 

 

Illinois Meadow Wildflower … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2018

 

 

 

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Elusive Peace…

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If we sincerely wish to be truly peaceful and help the world go beyond the conflict that tears people apart, then it would be prudent to exist as that which does not contribute to much of the separation and conflict.  It would be wise to be a global citizen, not a mere adherent to a particular political party, country, or race.   This isn’t anarchy here; it is intelligently working together as one, beyond all of the insane, disconnected nonsense.  It would also be foresighted and very thoughtful to not belong to an organized religious structure, with its own separate set of dogmas, beliefs, and hierarchical systems.  It is separative countries, traditions, organized religions, and beliefs that have largely contributed to wars and friction between people.  This is no small matter; people die over this stuff; young people die.  If we could come together, just as friends, putting away the absorbed patterns that cause so much of the friction, maybe that would be the start of truly being spiritual.  However, so many refuse to let go of the inherited patterns and traditions that they cling to.  If that would change, and if they would perceive and care instead of repeat and belong… we would have a planet with much less bloodshed.  So many of us were brainwashed into thinking that belonging to things gives us security; however, real global security, ironically, comes when man transcends belonging to systems that separate and cause friction.

White-breasted Nuthatch. Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2016

White-breasted Nuthatch. Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2016

 

 

 

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Peace…

6 comments

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Peace is everyone’s responsibility.  We must all go beyond violence and care for one another.  One is different from, but not separate from, whom one perceives.

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I’m 63 years old and I’ve kept tropical fish ever since I was in the 5th grade.  I even had an aquarium in my college dorms when I went to college.  For a long time now, I’ve been keeping, raising, and breeding, various forms of miniature catfish called Corydoras (“Cory” catfish).  In terms of peace, all of the species of the genus Corydoras are totally peaceful and non-belligerent; I have never, in all the years that I’ve had them, ever observed them acting aggressively or being hostile to one another, or toward other fish.   I was taking photographs of my miniature Corydoras Reticulated Julii Catfish when I noticed them laying eggs.  In the bottom photograph, the female is with a male (doing their thing); look closely at her bottom ventral fins; she is holding two eggs in those fins (as the fins are held together in a prayer-like fashion).  Later (after they are fertilized) she will (carry them around for quite some time) and then secure them to plant leaves or upon the aquarium glass.  (These catfish are definitely good for going green while keeping aquarium fish.  They do not require aquarium heaters, and two separate aquariums can be maintained with a 4 watt air pump.)  Corydoras are, like I mentioned, extremely peaceful… (plus they are beautiful and are always comical in their actions).

 

Trio of Corydoras trilineatus. Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2015

Trio of Corydoras trilineatus. Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2015

Corydoras trilineatus mating with eggs below clasped in female's bottom fins.  Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2015

Corydoras trilineatus mating with eggs below clasped in female’s bottom fins. Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2015