All Posts Tagged ‘cooperative games

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8 x 8 = 64

23 comments

 

When i was a child, i was the scissors, the paste, the glue, and the papers.  

We were instructed to (each one of us) cut out a small paper kite and attach it to a big pegboard on the schoolroom wall.                                                                                                                                The teacher stated that whoever learned their multiplication tables to a certain                                                                                                                                                                 level would be allowed to raise their kite higher to a corresponding level.                                                                                                                                                                              I cut my kite into a grotesque shape.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Our teacher asked me why (while i was good at art) i made my kite so distorted                                                                                                                                                           and “out of shape.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         I told her that i did not want to have a nice kite that would appear to soar higher                                                                                                                                             than the kites of all of my friends.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        I refused to learn the multiplication tables.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        I remember, at that young age, thinking that my teacher was very crude and                                                                                                                                                         unrefined for asking us to compete in such a way against each other.                                                                                                                                                                                   After a couple of weeks, the teacher allowed me to learn the multiplication tables                                                                                                                                                       without having to place my kite on the bulletin board.                                                                                                                                                                                                           Years later, as a young adult, i visited (and worked for 6 wonderful months) in Perth,                                                                                                                                                   Ontario, at a magical place called “Family Pastimes.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                 They, at Family Pastimes, are caring vegetarians who make and sell cooperative (non-competitive) games.                                                                                                         Play together, not against each other.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     When i was a child, i was the ringing of the school bell, the giggling of boys and                                                                                                                                                                 girls, and the accordion-like, crushed paper coverings for plastic straws.

[Familypastimes.com]

64 flower stigmas, more or less. (1) Photo by Thomas Peace c.2016

64 flower stigmas, more or less. (1) Photo by Thomas Peace c.2016

64 flower stigmas, more or less. (2) Photo by Thomas Peace c.2016

64 flower stigmas, more or less. (2) Photo by Thomas Peace c.2016

 

 

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Many of us value rather cadaverous things…

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Many of us value rather cadaverous things.  So many value fancy possessions and excessively large houses that they are fond of showing off to others.   It is likely, however, that the intrinsic intelligence of the vast universe doesn’t give a rat’s behind about fancy possessions and elaborate, ostentatious houses.  Real value is in what is free… like integrity, compassion, and pristine, uncorrupt perception.  However, so many of us were miseducated to neglect those “deep and profound” things and, instead, were taught to chase after rather superficial things that must be “earned and acquired over time.”  (They are valuable-garbage-things; in other words, they are “valuable,” but they are — if you are of deep perception — essentially worthless garbage.)  Aspects of the real beauty of integrity, compassion, and uncorrupt perception are that they are beyond the greedy clutches of grasping and “earning” and so are (in a big way) beyond time.  Most people chase after the contrived, superficial shadows while failing to see the true value in what is timeless and alive.  They are caught — while the real jewels of life elude them — in showing off their dead, shadowy treasures to each other… trying to impress.   

Before i retired, i had, as one of my students, who — though having mental retardation and though being severely multiply handicapped, including being blind and having paraplegia — had a great sense of humor and a very caring disposition.  He never displayed any hatred or malice toward anyone.  He often stated, “I love everyone.”  He never displayed any pretentious behavior; he never — though handicapped, he was more gifted than most of the other students — flaunted his abilities, and he never wanted much, but he was always happy, always joyful and caring.  He would always joke around a lot — he was a great member of our Royal Order of the Moose Club (similar to the Royal Order of Racoons on the Honeymooners show) — and he would often laugh and be zestfully living. He recently passed away.  I spoke at his funeral service to those who attended.  Many attended… because he was so genuine and pure.  He was my teacher (in a big way too); i learned a lot (about goodness and about value) from him.

Miseducation magnifies false values, portraying them to be precious.  It also often overemphasizes competition rather than joyful cooperation.  Real education goes beyond false values and transcends separation, vanity, conflict, pride, imitation, racism, hatred, competition, environmental indifference, and fractional perception.  

 

[Note:  Many years ago, when i was young, i visited, worked at, and spent a lot of time (6 months) at Family Pastimes in Ontario, Canada.  The people there live in a marvelous, very beautiful rural area (with wild bear and beavers), are vegetarians, and they make and sell cooperative (non-competitive) games.  They have been making and selling exclusively cooperative games for over 40 years.  Check out their website sometime; you will be glad you did!  www.familypastimes.com]

Spicebush Swallowtail (1) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2016

Spicebush Swallowtail (1) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2016

Spicebush Swallowtail (2) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2016

Spicebush Swallowtail (2) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2016