All Posts Filed in ‘Photography

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Wordless Wednesday … Not!

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A true love of nature stays local as much as possible and avoids using deadly fossil-fuel jet planes and fossil-fuel road vehicles to travel world-wide to go to “exotic” nature places; such worldwide-sight-seeing (and picture-taking) is not loving nature; nature is not a Disney Amusement Park.   Our globe is very delicate, fragile, and we have been brainwashed and conditioned to think nothing of traveling long distances for mere amusement purposes.  Aircraft emit staggering amounts of CO2, the most prevalent manmade greenhouse gas.  If you love nature, stay local.    

 

 

Perfect symbiosis … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

 

 

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The fire of felicity, intense happiness, radiates from within.

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The fire of felicity, intense happiness, radiates from within.

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[This Jumping Spider is, specifically, a Daring Jumping Spider. The chelicerae (the part containing the fangs) are a flamboyant metallic green and this is an excellent way to identify this particular jumping spider.  These spiders like sunshine and do their hunting during the day. They jump from leaf to leaf with great dexterity and accurately (because of all those splendid stereoscopic eyes) leap on their prey and often eat other spiders as well as insects.  They are totally harmless to human beings… and are beneficial, as they eat harmful insect pests.  To me, they seem intelligent (considering their size) and rather cute!]

A handsome jumper. Photo by Thomas Peace 2014

A handsome jumper. Photo by Thomas Peace 2014

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Though everything has marginal boundaries and borders…

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Though everything has marginal boundaries and borders… see everything as “all one” unbroken whole!

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[A Dingy Cutworm Moth and a Ladybug (and other small insects) on a Wild Sunflower plant.  Dingy Cutworm Moths are considered pests to crops, such as soybeans, while Ladybugs eat smaller insect pests, such as aphids, and are very beneficial.]

The Lady and the Tramp. Photo by Thomas Peace 2014

The Lady and the Tramp. Photo by Thomas Peace 2014

 

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Petrified Dinosaur Bone…

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.    Do not merely be frozen in time like what is petrified in mediocrity.

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.     A few of samples of dinosaur bone from the Jurassic Period, from southern Utah.  The bones, in natural formations, get permeated, under intense heat and pressure,  by various  minerals… and, depending on the minerals, various colors can occur… some more rare than others.  The bones are cut and polished… a time consuming process.  Each bone is unique in its own way.  Dinosaur bone easily becomes permeated because it is full of air pockets and blood vessel chambers to lighten its mass and (unlike in mammals) as an aid to respiration and air storage.   (Their respiratory system was, back then,  way more advanced than ours is today!  Birds, which evolved from dinosaurs, have such an advanced respiratory system.)

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Polished Dinosaur Bone (1) by Thomas Peace 2013

Polished Dinosaur Bone (1) by Thomas Peace 2013

Polished Dinosaur Bone (2) by Thomas Peace 2013

Polished Dinosaur Bone (2) by Thomas Peace 2013

Polished Dinosaur Bone (3) by Thomas Peace 2013

Polished Dinosaur Bone (3) by Thomas Peace 2013

Polished Dinosaur Bone (4) by Thomas Peace 2013

Polished Dinosaur Bone (4) by Thomas Peace 2013

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Troodon Dinosaur Fossil Teeth, etc…

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The following are a couple of fossils from Troodon formosus, a small (though rather intelligent) dinosaur from the Maastrichtian Period of the Upper Cretaceous (around 75 million years ago).  The fossils come from the Two Medicine Formation of Pontera County, Montana.  They are rather rare.  Troodon was little (by dinosaur standards)… only weighing in at around 70 pounds.  They are one of my most favorite of dinosaurs.  This is because they were closely related to the bird lineage… and because they were rather intelligent (having the biggest brain to body weight ratio, of all the dinosaurs).  Though some of the troodontid dinosaurs (related to Troodon) did have nice sized brains, their brains were (according to recent data) not exceptionally large.  Troodon formosus, one of the troodontid species, however, seems to have had a pretty large brain (relatively speaking).  Lines in the cranial case (of Troodon skulls) even show the beginnings of brain matter enfolding, just as our human brains exist as.  The partial cranial cases of Troodons shows some impressions from convoluting of the brain matter.  Additionally, Troodons, unlike most all theropod dinosaurs, had opposable thumbs.  They were able to pick up and examine small objects!

Troodons, from their teeth structure, were mostly meat-eaters, though most of them were probably omnivorous.  Troodon, unlike many dinosaurs with a few large teeth… had a lot of small, serrated teeth.  Each side of the lower jaw of Troodon, for example, had around 35 teeth.  They likely fed a lot on our ancestors… for, before that giant asteroid impact hit, dinosaurs were the ruling class, and would hunt and eat plenty of little mammals (like our ancestors).  Old scientific books on dinosaurs were very wrong; dinosaurs were not just slow, cold blooded and sluggish.  Many of them had thermal oriented bodies just as birds did; in fact, birds are closely related to the theropod line of dinosaurs.  (Really, birds are theropods!) Birds have a super high (and hot) metabolism… and so did the theropod dinosaurs.  They were more active than even the mammals… with way superior breathing mechanisms; this holds true to this day.  Most birds (and likely past theropod dinosaurs) had an average body temperature of around 105 degrees Fahrenheit.  

Troodon fossils (consisting of teeth) found in Alaska were twice the size of those found in the Montana area.  Why?  Paleontologists speculate that the extremely cold climate (of Alaska) back then prevented most theropods, such as T-rex, from living in Alaska.  Without the competition from T-rex and similar dinosaurs, Troodon was able to be the top predator, thus enabling it to get proportionally larger.  Troodons also had (on each foot, just like velociraptors) a raised sickle claw… used for attacking, and disemboweling, larger prey.

Paleontologists speculate that if that 6 mile across asteroid would not have hit 65 million years ago… dinosaurs like Troodon may have evolved to be very intelligent… maybe even with human-like intelligence.  But the asteroid hit… and mammals are reading this blog… not beings from the superorder Dinosauria.   We had better get our act together, limit our superfluous population, and get way more into green energy… or we will sadly go extinct like the dinosaurs did!

Image of Troodon, by MALvit of Deviant Art...

Image of Troodon, by MALvit of Deviant Art…

The Troodon Tooth below is rare, in that it has the unworn, complete posterior and anterior serrations.  Paleontologists say that this type of tooth was used for eating a lot of soft flesh and likely some veggies too. 

Troodon Tooth with Anterior and Posterior Serrations by Thomas Peace 2013

Troodon Tooth with Anterior and Posterior Serrations by Thomas Peace 2013

Below: A large Troodon tooth in matrix… still partially embedded in the substrate that it was found in.

Large Troodon tooth in Matrix by Thomas Peace 2013

Large Troodon tooth in Matrix by Thomas Peace 2013

Below:  Fossil finger digit of a Troodon; it shows capability of being highly opposable.

Troodon Fossil Finger Digit by Thomas Peace 2013

Troodon Fossil Finger Digit by Thomas Peace 2013

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Photos of Unusual Allosaurus Dinosaur Fossil Vertebra (150 Million Years Old)…

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The name Allosaurus was derived from the Greek, and it means “different lizard.”  It was considered “different,” by paleontologists, because its bones were a lot lighter than in dinosaurs previous to its existence.  Its bones were much lighter because they were riddled with many more air channels and blood vessel channels that previous species of dinosaur did not have as much of.  This allowed it to be faster and more nimble for its size,  which are great benefits to a big, meat-eating animal.

As most of you probably know… Allosaurus was a huge, carnivorous dinosaur.  It occurred in the Jurassic Period, around 150 to 155 million years ago.  The following is a photo (not taken by me) of an Allosaurus skeleton on exhibit (at the San Diego Natural History Museum).

Allosaurus (San Diego Natural History Museum)
Allosaurus (San Diego Natural History Museum)

The following are photographs of an Allosaurus vertebra (backbone) that I purchased at one time.  The vertebra comes from southern Utah.  The vertebra was split in half; then each half was polished (on the side where the split occurred) to show the beautiful cells and spaces within the bone.  Certain dinosaur bones (in certain isolated localities) become (over millions of years) permineralized by various minerals that permeate into the bone cells over time.  Depending what the minerals are… the colors (within the bone spaces) can be of many different types… some very beautiful.  This particular Allosaurus specimen has white crystallizations within… which look quite nice.

After I had the bone in my possession for a while, I noticed that one of the halves had a couple of places (on it) that were entry ways for pneumatic diverticulae.  Pneumatic diverticulae, in the more evolved of the dinosaurs, were branches and channels — that would come from the air sacs and lungs —  that would bore into and through the bones, enabling air (from the lungs) to be stored and transported.  (So, unlike mammals, they could transport and store air within their bones!)  Some of these channels would (later) progress to the outside of the body (and allow gases to be emitted out of the organism).  Younger dinosaurs do not have these, at first; they grow and increase (and branch out more and more) as the animal ages.  Many birds have this.   A turkey wing — that someone is preparing for consumption — may have a little hole in the skin here or there.  These are the exit chambers of the pneumatic channels!  (A young turkey may not have these holes;  most turkeys sold — to consume — are young turkeys).   Birds are actually evolved from (and they are) dinosaurs.   Many mammals, including humans, have cranial pneumaticity (exclusively in their heads)… but only dinosaur/birds have the very advanced postcranial pneumaticity (as well as an advanced form of the cranial kind).

Mammals (such as we humanoids) do not have this advanced kind of respiratory system.  Ours is much more primitive.  You won’t hear this taught in public schools; they, of course, continue to put on airs of superiority for our species!  (I tell things straight, though, just as I do in my book.)  One of the reasons why dinosaurs had such a monopoly over mammals for millions and millions of years has to do with their superior respiratory systems.  In dinosaurs (and birds), special air sacs and pipework keep (new) fresh air coming into their lungs consistently.  Air flows into a bird’s lungs only in one direction.  Air from the (pre-lung) air-sac that puts air into a bird’s (or dinosaur’s) lungs is always being replenished with fresh air.  Air from another (post-lung) air-sac that comes “from” their lungs… always is pushing out “old-used” air.  The lungs never get the bad (used) air coming in with the fresh.  Air only travels in one direction through their (i.e., dinosaurs’) lungs; their lungs are not the inefficient “in and out” kind (like blowing in and out of a paper sack) like ours (i.e., the mammals’) are.  In fact, the lungs of dinosaurs (and birds, which are a small type of dinosaur) do not ever move; only the air-sacs around them move!   Our lungs (of mammals) that move with the ribs, muscles, and diaphragm around them, breathe in the same bad air that we were trying to exhale (and through the same pipework too);  that is very inefficient.  That is one of the reasons why dinosaurs reigned supreme for so many millions of years… until that 6-mile-across asteroid wiped most of them out (except for the birds); the impact of that asteroid also wiped out 70% of all species on earth.   Mammals, during the time of the dinosaurs, were always small, mostly nocturnal, and would hide under rocks (which is one of the reasons why we survived that impact); there were no large mammals during the time of the dinosaurs… because the dinosaurs were too dominant over the mammals.   Most dinosaurs were a lot more hot blooded — the average body temperature of birds is 105 degrees Fahrenheit —  a lot better at breathing… and (hence) a lot more sprightly and agile than the mammals.  (The dinosaurs were not “sluggish,” as we were once — not long ago — taught.)  If that asteroid would have missed the earth… they would still be the dominant ones… and who knows what they would have evolved into…

The following is a photo of the two halves of an Allosaurus vertebra with crystal cells (after polishing).  Weight: 5 lb 10 oz

The cells, which once were air channels and passageways for blood vessels, are now filled with crystallized minerals (various silica, calcite, dolomite and other minerals).

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Allosaurus Dinosaur Split Vertebra by Thomas Peace c.2013

Allosaurus Dinosaur Split Vertebra by Thomas Peace c.2013

Note (in the photo below) the larger oval crystal section around the center; look to the right and (especially) to the left of it to see where the pneumatic diverticulae have entry-ways (fossae pleurocels, or pneumatic pores) that enter the vertebra bone from the air sacs/lungs!  If you look at such a dinosaur vertebra, you will see little spots here and there on its sides; these are the entry-ways (fossae pleurocels/pneumatic pores) that go into the bone.  This vert was cut just at the “right spot” (i.e., right where the pneumatic diverticulae enter the bone… as pneumatic pores); the guy who used to polish these didn’t have the faintest idea about what these entry-ways were!    I’ve sent pictures of this to, and have corresponded with, a noted paleontologist.  (The action of the pneumatic diverticulae functions almost like an organism within an organism; it is a very advanced stage in regard to breathing physiology.)

(Left click on the photos to enlarge; hit left return arrows to return back.)

Allosaurus Vertebra (1) by Thomas Peace c. 2013

Allosaurus Vertebra (1) by Thomas Peace c. 2013

Some close-ups…(please note, in the first of the following photos, the entry-way — the pneumatic fossa, or pneumatic pore — going into the vertabra )…  It’s the “spear-shaped” chamber on the left.  (It would form a convoluted passageway throughout the vert in ways we can’t simply see via a slice-view.)

Allosaurus Vertebra (2) by Thomas Peace c.2013

Allosaurus Vertebra (2) by Thomas Peace c.2013

Allosaurus Vertebra (3) by Thomas Peace c.2013

Allosaurus Vertebra (3) by Thomas Peace c.2013

Allosaurus Vertebra (4) by Thomas Peace c.2013

Allosaurus Vertebra (4) by Thomas Peace c.2013

Allosaurus Vertebra (5) by Thomas Peace c.2013

Allosaurus Vertebra (5) by Thomas Peace c.2013

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[A subsequent post,we’ll have, is: Photos of fossil Troodon Dinosaur (the “intelligent” dinosaur)]

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Highly Recommended:

Cool DVDs of Allosaurus:

You can get these at amazon.com or at ebay:

Allosaurus: A Walking with Dinosaurs Special

Jurassic Fight Club:  Season One

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Photo of 300 Million Year Old Damselfly Fossil that I found…

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Here’s a photo of a 300 million year old fossil of a Damselfly that I found in the Mazon Creek area (of Illinois).  Mazon Creek is world famous for the soft bodied fossils of animals and plants from the Pennsylvanian Period.

The entire piece is a little over 6 inches wide.  The Damselfly is  toward the lower right section, is facing right, with its hind-end abdomen (on the left, tilting down below the wings).  If you look closely at the fossil, under the head to the right, you can see little fossilized legs; these legs were (apparently) kicking at the time when the insect became entrapped in mud or sediment (hence the darker impression under the head from the kicking/struggling).  There are sections with Pennsylvanian foliage, also fossilized on the piece.

I mentioned the fossil in the comment section of Jerry Stolarski’s blog… and he requested that I post a photo of it.  So here it is…

300 Million Year Old Damsel Fly fossil Thomas Peace c. 2013

300 Million Year Old Damsel Fly fossil Thomas Peace c. 2013

Below is a photo of Damselflies in a mating ritual.  Note that, after millions of years of evolution, their abdomens are a lot thinner and streamlined.  Why would that be advantageous?   Well, it could enable them to fly better… and it would prevent their great enemy from getting a lot of extra nourishment… thus keeping their enemy’s population down!

Damsel fly mating ritual Thomas Peace c. 2013

Damsel fly mating ritual Thomas Peace c. 2013

Below:   Their archenemy not getting as much nourishment 300 million years later!   (I’ll post some pics of spiders in 55 million year old Baltic Amber in the future.)

Spider & Damsel fly by Thomas Peace c. 2013

Spider & Damsel fly by Thomas Peace c. 2013

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3D Nature Photographs…

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These are 3D nature photos that I’ve taken; they’re (like my writings) not superficial!  They are best viewed online via the use of a Pokescope 3D Viewer.  One can order these easily online.  Or one can do it by utilizing the “Eye-cross” method.”   I can do it instantly… I’m so accustomed to it.  However, it may be a bit difficult for a “newbie.”  The Pokescope 3D Viewer is better (and it would work best by looking at the pictures while not enlarged).  Viewing the photos on the 3D camera LCD or on a printed 3D lenticular is best.

Here’s how to view (via the Eye-cross method):

First, left click on one of the photos (to enlarge it); you can later return simply by clicking on the left return arrow.

1.Sit around three feet from your computer screen.  Put your fists together about one foot in front of you.

2. Lift your index fingers up and keep them about 2 inches apart (and pointing slightly toward the bottom of the middle of the two pictures).  Still keeping your index fingers mostly pointing up (and two inches apart), cross your eyes and try to produce a steady floating image of a “virtual” finger that is between the two real fingers.

3. Once you get good at making that steady “virtual” finger… take a look at the middle “virtual” image behind it; it will be 3D… and will stay locked in place (and focused) once you get “good at it.”  Enjoy!   (It takes practice!)

Alternate Method:   (You still have to cross your eyes correctly…but it’s more cool, by far…)  Another good way to do it…(that I invented)…  is to make “Fake 3d Glasses” with your own hands; first put your open hands against your face (just outside of each eye, with fingers pointing up… like visors); then cup your index fingers and thumbs together to make “glasses”;  look at the middle 3D image as before.  The palm of your left hand should block your left eye from seeing the left picture (but enable your left eye to see the right picture); the palm of your right hand should block your right eye from seeing the right picture (but enable your right eye to see the left picture).  As you look through your fake human glasses… your palms should be cupping to block the necessary side pictures, while allowing the middle virtual picture to exist exclusively on its own!   Sweet!   😉

Let me know if you were able to do it.  Otherwise, just look at the enlarged (though not as clear) pictures in 2D.   Some people are better at it than others; it takes practice!

My 3d camera shows 3d images on its LCD screen (without needing 3d glasses), which is really cool.  It’s a Fujifilm  FinePix Real 3D  W3.    One can order 5×7 inch permanent 3D pictures, of photos that one has taken, that one can view (without the need for 3D glasses or needing to do the 3D method described above); the 5x7s are made with special lenticular coatings (to make them easily seen in 3D).

eternalfountainofyouth.com 

3D Dandelion and Bee photo by Thomas Peace c. 2013

3D Dandelion and Bee photo by Thomas Peace c. 2013

Ladybug photo by Thomas Peace c. 2013

Ladybug photo by Thomas Peace c. 2013

Bee's Friend, Man's Enemy by Thomas Peace c.2013

Bee’s Friend, Man’s Enemy by Thomas Peace c.2013

Fledglings by Thomas Peace c.2013

Fledglings by Thomas Peace c.2013

Jiminy Cricket by Thomas Peace c.2013

Jiminy Cricket by Thomas Peace c.2013

Lacewing by Thomas Peace c.2013

Lacewing by Thomas Peace c.2013

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Memory is Always Old…

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Memory is always old and of “the past.”  It involves symbolic images and words in a recollection of past occurrences, past things, past events, and past experiences.  Memory is usually heavily conditioned by the learned patterns that society has shaped within us.  The memory bank is an accumulation of these past (learned) things and past experiences. Things are categorized within us, according to how we’ve been taught.  We often merely see things through a process that is dictated through the learned screen of memory. Recognition is often largely memory reinforcing itself.  Being more than something that is second-hand… involves going beyond all this in a fundamental way.

This arrangement (of memories) can become rearranged (and reshuffled) and, in having done so, relatively new things and ideas can become established.  Such a rearrangement can either be very beneficial (to life on earth) or not very beneficial, or somewhere in between.  People come up with all kinds of ways to “sell” or “profit from” their ideas.  This profitability either is motivated to benefit the self or to benefit humanity and life (or both); oftentimes it lies somewhere in between.  A truly wise man, however, deeply perceives that the self is not, in truth, separate from the rest of humanity (and life).  Such a person’s motivation may not lie within what was merely learned via past experiences and via various types of stored memory.  This is because real insight can spring into existence (in a serious person) regardless of what past memories and experiences existed previously.

Deep and profound insight cannot be purposefully brought about by any method, system, or procedure.  Otherwise such insight would merely be the formulations of (or partially formulated by) a plan.  Planning takes time, and deep insight exists beyond the realm of what can be concocted in time.  True insight is timeless.  It is a profound, spontaneous explosion beyond what one had learned or experienced via memory. The profundity of insight can (out of compassion) shape someone’s memory; but one’s memory can never shape, fabricate, or bring about true insight.  The mechanism of memory (as the thinking process) must end (for deep insight to take place).  This ending, of course, cannot come about via any contrived process, procedure, or devised strategy.  An ending resultant from some kind of blueprint is a mechanically formulated effect… which is not, truly, an ending.  If the cause involves “plotting” and “calculation”… the end will be also be rather ordinary, near-predictable, and mundane.  Most people were taught that “ending,” for them, is something that is “not good.”  However, ending “psychologically” may not, at all, be deleterious.  Most people endlessly cling to (their) memory.  (That is what they were taught… and that is what they have absorbed; that is what they continually function as.)

eternalfountainofyouth.com

Insects and flowers have always had a symbiotic relationship with each other.  The flower feeds the insects and the insects help pollinate, clean, and protect the flower.

Photo of ant on a lily flower by Thomas Peace c. 2012:

[Left click on the photo to see a larger version… then left click on the “center” of it again (up to 2 times) to expand it further; hit left “arrows” to return.]

Ant on Lily by Thomas Peace c. 2012