All Posts Tagged ‘trees

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Short Story about the Best Wooden Thing

35 comments

 

 

Once, there was a burly man who carved things out of wood.
Many people in his village would each ask him to carve something special for them, and he usually would, with great pride.
The man would often boast about what he could expertly carve.
Then, one day, a little girl — who had never asked the man to carve anything whatsoever — asked him what the best wooden thing is.
“I am not sure,” said the man, perplexedly, “Maybe it is the large horse that I once carved for Mr. Hayes.”
“No,” said the girl, confidently, “It is that large, beautiful, living Oak tree that grows in our yard.”

 

 

Very young Oak tree sapling just beginning to get there. Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2019

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That Eternal Visitor

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It came when we weren’t expecting it to come
             beyond the moonlit glow
It came when we weren’t expecting it to come
             beyond the realm of know
It came when we weren’t expecting it to come
             such bliss energy and love
It came when we were not existing separately
             that eternal immeasurability from above

 

 

 

Budding Beginnings… Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2018

 

 

 

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Zilch…

23 comments

 

Diddle and Twiddle each played

          their own fiddle

          and since there were only two of them playing

No one was in the middle

 

They played tactfully(and as Diddle

          ejected a bit of spittal)

          Twiddle nervously giggled and said,

“It seems to be starting to drizzle”

 

Next,Diddle remarked,

          “Please don’t piddle;

the rhyme does have a middle”

 

And then,in his transmittal,Twiddle said,

           “This poem seems to

           have a riddle”

           Then,his third brother,No one,said,

           “I’m just a triple nobody

           stuck here in the middle,

          so please do not belittle”

 

And it’s enlightening to psychologically exist

           as nothing

With that,you need not quibble

 

[Note:   The following are photos of an old dead tree that is adjacent to a large, local hospital.   It is situated within the hospital grounds, right next to where many handicapped parking spots exist.  Almost as if it had been in tune with the comings and goings of the patients, face shapes exist in places where the tree’s bark fell off.  How many “faces” can you see within the tree’s patterns?]

Faces in the wood (1) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2017

Faces in the wood (2) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2017

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Mushroom Tree Communication

25 comments

 

looming flux(therefour)

          from symbiotic muck

summoned by Mother Oak

          now spurt from mycelium

to merge near and welcome baby

 

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By Dr. Mercola:

The name mycorrhiza literally means fungus-root.  These fungi form a symbiotic relationship with the plant, colonizing the roots and sending extremely fine filaments far out into the soil that act as root extensions. Not only do these networks sound the alarm about invaders, but the filaments are more effective in nutrient and water absorption than the plant roots themselves—mycorrhizae increase the nutrient absorption of the plant 100 to 1,000 times.

In one thimbleful of healthy soil, you can find several MILES of fungal filaments, all releasing powerful enzymes that help dissolve tightly bound soil nutrients, such as organic nitrogen, phosphorus, and iron. The networks can be enormous—one was found weaving its way through an entire Canadian forest, with each tree connected to dozens of others over distances of 30 meters.

These fungi have been fundamental to plant growth for 460 million years. Even more interesting, mycorrhizae can even connect plants of different species, perhaps allowing interspecies communication.

More than 90 percent of plant species have these naturally-occurring symbiotic relationships with mycorrhizae, but in order for these CMNs to exist, the soil must be undisturbed. Erosion, tillage, cultivation, compaction, and other human activities destroy these beneficial fungi, and they are slow to colonize once disrupted. Therefore, intensively farmed plants don’t develop mycorrhizae and are typically less healthy, as a result.

Communication (1) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2017

Communication (1) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2017

Communication (2) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2017

Communication (2) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2017

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That neverending tree… (Multi-Photo)

5 comments

.

We’re all flowers of that neverending tree

and if we don’t ever blossom

we won’t be open, wise, and free

 

None of us are separate within that immense, majestic being

but if perception doesn’t see it

it really isn’t seeing

.

Eastern Redbud Study.  (1)  Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2015

Eastern Redbud Study. (1) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2015

Eastern Redbud Study.  (2)  Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2015

Eastern Redbud Study. (2) Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2015