Monthly Archives of: May 2021

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Prose-Poem of Each Wish

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Each wish came upon an intangible dream.
All dreams are intangible, being the virtual aspirations or speculations that they are. In a world past dreamers, he or she who sees things as they are (beyond distortion), ironically, does not merely see things… because things are of thought’s plurality that is largely illusory and superficial (though important to respond to accordingly at times).

Life, despite what most people think, isn’t a series of things. Life is beyond the plurality of appearances that are tricks upon the mind. Life is not wholeness either, for such wholeness, for most, is just another thing, just another abstraction to dream about.

While in the garden, the handsome blue Hostas and the attractive, purple Columbine flowers were not separate from the mind; then they were beyond mere labeling and definition; spontaneously, they transformed into what cannot be described or dreamed about. Then beauty was the “observing” and was beyond mere “observing.”

In that garden,
there was careful “observing”
and there was “beyond observing.”
The two danced
in harmony
beyond fabricated plurality and
wholeness.
Curious, the ants, as to what moved
past them in a vastness.

A World Past Dreamers … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021
Life on its Journey ... Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021
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The Story of Lo Zu and the Supposedly Religious Monks (Yet Another short Lo Zu Tale)…

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A couple of young men were walking near to where the aged Lo Zu was resting. He was sitting on an inclined large log with his meandering cane resting along his side. Then they observed Lo Zu walking — with his curved, wooden cane — to a nearby evergreen tree, where he presently stopped and began stooping next to the tree, looking at something down low toward the ground; he had a big smile upon his bearded face as he looked at something upon a blade of green.

The young men asked Lo Zu what he was gazing at. “Life on its journey,” reported Lo Zu.

Just then, a group of monks came walking by, all with shaved heads that were bowed down, with eyes only staring at the empty path that they were treading upon, while their “leader” marched ahead, “leading them.” The two youth said to Lo Zu, “Many say that you are the wisest man in all of the lands, yet we see that you do not march with the others and go to the temples.”

Lo Zu replied, “They march with their heads held down — not looking around whatsoever — and follow a path which they’ve been walking upon for centuries, and that path, honestly, is empty and dead. Life is not flowering in such a path. They do not look around to freely and joyfully perceive the beauty of the skies and the miracles of nature; they follow a leader who may be as blinded as they are. They spend time in the temple. It is full of man-made statues. They revere these lifeless statues, all of which were made by thought. They revere a dead product of their own creation. I, however, do not enter the temples. I remain away from the cold, lifeless buildings and spend time with nature, with creation… life. I am neither fascinated by dead, empty paths, man-made fabrications, nor with leaders who lead others to closing their lives away from life and the beauty of existence. Their fancy garbs and decorative buildings do not make them truly religious. Being religious is a living thing. If you are going to worship something, worship that poor, elderly woman toiling in the fields. Help her to carry her heavy load to her home (without asking anything in return).”

Life on its Journey ... Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021
Life on its Journey … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021

Plum Tree Blossoms Smiling ... Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021
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The Story of Lo Zu and the Teenage Youth Group (Another short Lo Zu Tale)…

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The elderly Lo Zu walked through a long, beautiful meadow and came near to the local village.   He saw a group of youth sitting near a fenced garden and ambled near to them while holding on to his sinuous, meandering cane.  As he walked, he smiled at the majestic, wonderous blue sky and at the beautiful trees dancing in the light breeze that he was not (in any way) apart from.  Many of the young people looked rather bored, and excitement and wonderment were missing from their eyes.  Lo Zu said to them, “When i was your age, i too sometimes would get bored; I too found myself lacking in exciting things to do.  Now, in my elderly age, there is no boredom; there is only harmony and bliss.”

“What is your secret?, one of the youth asked.

Lo Zu then said, “One went beyond what all of the others said about life, self, and consciousness.  The root of suffering was discovered and perceived.”

Some of the youth inquired, “What is the root of suffering?”

Lo Zu replied, “The ‘I,’ the ‘me,’ with all of its pretense and chicanery.  The ‘I’ or the ‘me’ helps create a space between what is considered a “center” and the rest of the world (even including between a thought of a supposed center-controller and thinking).  However, for example, thoughts and thinking are what consciousness is (as they occur), including the concept of ‘I’ or ‘myself.’  There is, though, a beautiful intelligence beyond and much greater than mere thoughts and thinking.  Such intelligence is of a wholeness and transcends the petty concepts of ‘I’ and ‘me.’  Such intelligence transcends psychological suffering/boredom, mere words as labels, and gross limitation; what is whole and immense is not dominated by what is false and limited.  Mental suffering is false and limited.  Only when one clings to the limited is the intelligence of the whole not apparent.  Look at everything beyond fragments, symbols, and images… and perhaps that intelligence will manifest.  Clinging to what the ordinary, every-day people tell you… may be like clinging to garbage.  Even clinging to ‘collected experiences’ (robotically) is childish and unnecessary.  Cling in that way if you wish, but as for this elderly being, there is too much bliss here to crave what is fundamentally of the dead past.  See the living beauty of life and nature in each instant (without merely always labeling and remembering).  Question things, be appreciative of life, perceive with wholeness, and go beyond the ordinary. “

The group of youth thanked Lo Zu and asked him to stop by to visit them again.

As he walked away, he heard one of them say, “He is not like the other elders; he is different; he seems magical.  When he looks at you, it is as if he can see right into you.”

 

Plum Tree Blossoms Smiling ... Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021
Plum Tree Blossoms Smiling … Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021

So nice to bee with you again! Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021
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On the State of Humanity

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When i am out in society sometimes — like grocery shopping, for instance — and see people, sometimes my eyes almost start tearing.  One just feels sorry for them.  It’s a tough life out there, and many people are really struggling, really suffering.  You, if you at all observant, can see it in their eyes.   Especially when i see children, i feel something deep inside.  They will be living in a world much more difficult to live in than the one that i lived most of my life in.  There will be many more people and less space.  There will be fewer jobs, more pollution, even more propaganda, and less truly healthy food.  The chances of them being educated rightly in a truly decent, alternative (non-mediocre) school with no more than 8 kids in a classroom and with much emphasis on wisdom, compassion, hands-on experiences (like growing vegetables outdoors, exploring nature, and making solar panels), on understanding beyond standard patterns, and on seeing life as a whole… are almost nil.   

Then one looks at the adults.  Many seem aged and “worn out” before their time.  Many show the effects of endless junk food, alcohol, and endless synthetic medications (prescribed by doctors who, these $-oriented days, are more like puppets of the pharmaceutical companies than true counselors about healthy living patterns and natural cures).   (Don’t get me wrong, many people need to be on prescription drugs… but not to the extent being dished out in this pill-happy day and age.)  Even a lot of our standard vitamins — tons of them really — these days, are largely made from synthetic products (derived from petroleum).  For instance, synthetic vitamin E does not come from a natural food source and is generally derived from petroleum products. Synthetic vitamin E (dl-alpha-tocopherol or any variation starting with dl-) is found in many commonly-sold multivitamin supplements, such as Centrum. You can’t help but feel sorry for people when you see what is being done to them.  Fragmentation within minds abounds, which inevitably manifests as disorder, indifference, and conflict.  It’s a crazy world.  Additionally, repercussions happen, and the disorder that ensues deleteriously affects the animals of the world too.  (There are good, holistic, magnanimous people too, but there are not nearly enough of them.)

In a big way, one really can’t blame people for what they are.  They are a product of their education (or maybe we should say “miseducation”) and their environment.   Very few of us really break free, truly intelligently question everything, and stand alone beyond all of the standard, mundane conditioning.  Most people psychologically consist of their conditioning.  It is very difficult to get people to change fundamentally… not according to any blueprint or pattern, not according to some concocted religion or government, but wisely, independently, and holistically beyond all of the antiquated past.  It is sad — it’s tragic really — that so many inevitably end up falling in a rut, stagnating, and then dying.   Things could be very different but, so far, the magic isn’t happening to a very great extent.   But we could wake up and help change things.  

 

So nice to bee with you again! Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021
So nice to bee with you again! Photo by Thomas Peace c. 2021