Monthly Archives of: May 2013

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Stillness and the mind of agitation…

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.     The basic essence of “thoughts” is that they are all essentially conditioned, as part of a cause/effect continuum.   Wisdom is pure silence.  Thoughts are vital for survival but — though this may seem odd to people in our exclusively thought-based society — most people, unfortunately,  greatly overuse the process of thinking.  (We are not suggesting that one vegetate into some kind of abyss of feeble-mindedness and ineptitude; the mind can often, in deep intelligence, be fully aware without merely thinking via sequential symbols).  Thoughts are symbolic, residual responses, and, as such, they inherently are limited, second-hand reactions.  Reactions have their place, but a mind that is heavily immersed in merely being essentially a series of reactions… tends to be a rather mechanical, robot-like mind (even though it may seem to be “normal” by society’s low standards).  Profound intelligence is warm (whole) action, not mechanistic (fragmentary) reaction.  To merely be one conditioned series after another, day in and day out, may be acceptable (and even “normal,” by society’s current standards), but it may not be what “truly living is” whatsoever.  If the implicit nature of thought is that it (i.e., all of it) is essentially conditioned and residual, then to truly be intelligently free, one must go beyond the parameters of thought/thinking.  

   To observe holistically requires more than just thought.  Thought/thinking is always fractional… and if one is constantly observing only through the filters constructed from symbolic thinking, then one cannot truly be observing holistically (though one may erroneously maintain that one sees the whole).  For too many, the “whole” is just another symbolic concept (or a series of learned concepts). Thought is always partial and crudely sequential; one can only basically think one thing — or just a few things — at a time.  A mind of perturbability is often bubbling with reactionary thought; most people are merely spewing with thought upon thought; a set — a continuous series — of mere conditioned reactions is fundamentally constituted of distortion.  (The current state of our society is a reflection of that distortion.)  If thought is always fractional and limited, it may be — in a way — akin to restless, fragmentary waves on the surface of a lake.  Each of the waves may reflect only a part of what is above (in a very distorted way).  An analogous, still lake is not as conducive to distortion (concerning the immeasurable, universal beauty of what is above).

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Stillness... by Thomas Peace 2013

Stillness… by Thomas Peace 2013

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To stagnate in limited space (and never fly from it)…

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.     Indifference, by the laws of nature and the cosmos, always manifests as a result of a limited space; that limited space is self-enclosing, circumscribed, and erroneously apart from vast reality.  (We are talking about psychological limited space here… not, for instance, the temporarily limited space of a birds nest — at a parameter of 74 degrees — surrounded by self-created crap, outdoors.)   What is profoundly sacred is never merely created by, nor constituted of…  limited space; the profoundly sacred is incapable of indifference.  The vast space and innocence of the profoundly sacred cannot meet (and never will meet) and merge with the corruption and indifference that is always limited, always shallow and confined.  This is not to imply that an intelligent mind — that transcends the limitation of indifference and fragmentary perception — cannot transform into what perceives vastly and superlatively.  What perceives vastly and superlatively may indeed be visited by what is not of the essence of limitation (i.e., by what is profoundly sacred and is indescribable by limited, symbolic words).  Limited thought and limited methodologies — and all thoughts and all methodologies are conditioned and have elements of limitation — cannot (through the limited time that they must exist as) ever bring about the vast and unlimited.  Only by ending effortlessly and naturally (without time being a factor, without calculating methodologies) can the truly timeless possibly manifest.  Do not make the mistake of merely stagnating in your own (self-created) crap.  

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To stagnate in limited space (and never fly from it) is to remain in crap forever (at a parameter of 74 degrees on the dial)... by Thomas Peace 2013

To stagnate in limited space (and never fly from it) is to remain in crap forever (at a parameter of 74 degrees on the dial)… by Thomas Peace 2013

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What man-made climate change could do…

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Hourglass tree frogThe study looked at the impacts of rising temperatures on nearly 50,000 common species

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More than half of common plant species and a third of animals could see a serious decline in their habitat range because of climate change.

New research suggests that biodiversity around the globe will be significantly impacted if temperatures rise more than 2C.

But the scientists say that the losses can be reduced if rapid action is taken to curb greenhouse gases.

The paper is published in the journal, Nature Climate Change.

An international team of researchers looked at the impacts of rising temperatures on nearly 50,000 common species of plants and animals.

They looked at both temperature and rainfall records for the habitats that these species now live in and mapped the areas that would remain suitable for them under a number of different climate change scenarios.

The scientists projected that if no significant efforts were made to limit greenhouse gas emissions, 2100 global temperatures would be 4C above pre-industrial levels.

In this model, some 34% of animal species and 57% of plants would lose more than half of their current habitat ranges.

WildfireIn some regions, climate change could increase the area burned by wildfires

According to Dr Rachel Warren from the University of East Anglia, this would have major impacts for everyone on the planet.

“Our research predicts that climate change will greatly reduce the diversity of even very common species found in most parts of the world. This loss of global-scale biodiversity would significantly impoverish the biosphere and the ecosystem services it provides,” she said.

“There will also be a knock-on effect for humans because these species are important for things like water and air purification, flood control, nutrient cycling, and eco-tourism.”

The projected impacts on species will be felt more heavily in some parts of the world such as sub-Saharan Africa, Central America, the Amazon region and Australia.

However the researchers say that if global emissions of greenhouse gases are cut rapidly then the impact on biodiversity could be significantly curbed. If global emissions reach their peak in 2016 and temperature rises are held to 2C, then losses could be cut by 60%.

“The good news is that our research provides new evidence of how swift action to reduce CO2 and other greenhouse gases can prevent the biodiversity loss by reducing the amount of global warming to 2C rather than 4 degrees, said Dr Warren.

“This would also buy time – up to four decades – for plants and animals to adapt to the remaining 2 degrees of climate change.”

Friend (1) by Thomas Peace 2013

Friend (1) by Thomas Peace 2013

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Book Review: Ellis Nelson’s “Into the Land of Snows”…

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Into the Land of Snows is a penetrating novel (suitable for young and old alike) that impressively delves into the adventures of a young man, Blake, as he explores the enigmatic and mystifyingly pure domain of the Himalayan region.  Nelson’s book faithfully reflects the true, pristine, raw, deeply reverent — in terms of seeking the truly sacred — atmosphere of the region.  Her book reveals how splendidly innocent, caring, down-to-earth, and “immersed in exploring reality” the region’s people tend to be.  Indeed, the Sherpa people of that region have long been known for their physical longevity, kind disposition, and deep religiosity. 

Nelson takes us along with the young man… having us share in his baffling and mystical adventures (in a way that enables us to feel as if we are there ourselves, in the midst of the majestic, magnificent universal life forces).  The difficult steps that he takes, concerning adjusting to the steep inclines and ultra-thin atmosphere, concomitantly mesh with his difficult and conflicting thoughts (concerning his relationship with his family, his culture, and his complicated world).  Nelson effectively puts us in his shoes, and we (too) share in the seemingly insurmountable mental difficulties and mysterious (unfathomable) terrains, which Blake must courageously face. 

I deeply enjoyed how Nelson reveals how the Himalayas is an unspoiled, innocent region; it contains something that — unfortunately and regrettably — our so-called modern, materialistic culture has lost.  Largely (which may coincide with their lofty mountains) the beautiful Sherpa people base their lives mostly around touching and encountering the sacred, the divine.  Our so-called modern culture, conversely, is more enmeshed with material success, flaunting possessions, sticking to details, and “having a good time”.  What we fail to realize is that mere pursuit involving “having a good time” is largely a childish waste of time.  Not perceiving the “truly lofty” is like crudely remaining in the low valley forever.  Change, if you can.  Read Into the Land of Snows.  Climb to new levels; the way to grow is by going up!

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Into the Land of Snows

Into the Land of Snows

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Psychological barriers…

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.     Though this might seem a bit odd, it isn’t:  Only by clinging to learned and inherited psychological barriers does one (ignorantly) keep oneself in the very limited (barren and ordinary) domain of sequential time; sequential time depends upon limited space and boundaries of confinement.  By natural law, a limited, self-centered ego must seem to fabricate a fallacious barrier (around itself) consisting of (circumscribed) limited space.  Limited space necessitates limited time.  An apparent limited space cannot be measured or experienced, unless limited time is involved.  

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Physical not psychological barrier... by Thomas Peace 2013

Physical not psychological barrier… by Thomas Peace 2013

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The monotony of inner mental filters…

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.     Only a brain trained to exclusively look through the monotony of inner mental filters (composed of images/representative symbols) perceives things in a dull or tedious routine. 

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.  [The following are photos of one of our Emerald Catfish (that we’ve had for many years); they can live to be 18 years or older in captivity.  They move their eyes in a peculiar way… as if they are winking at you!  They sometimes rise to the surface to gulp down air; their intestines are riddled with many capillaries that absorb oxygen.  They are aptly named!  They are very comical in the way they behave!]

Emerald Catfish (1) by Thomas Peace 2013

Emerald Catfish (1) by Thomas Peace 2013

Emerald Catfish (2)... by Thomas Peace 2013
Emerald Catfish (2)… by Thomas Peace 2013

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Cannot blame God…

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.     Though the truly sacred exists, it may very well be that we (in our primeval ways) cannot correctly blame God for what goes on (in a harmful, disorderly fashion) in this universe… because it may be that our universe is manifest of energy as part of a multiplex of universes that were never created (and cannot be destroyed).   

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Another blood sucking politician... by Thomas Peace 2013

Another blood sucking politician… by Thomas Peace 2013

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Fly Caught by Spider in 55 Million Year Old Baltic Amber…

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.     The following is a photo I took of an action shot that has (literally) existed for 55 million years.  The photo is of a piece of Baltic Amber that contains a fly as it is being attacked by a spider.  The resins from certain trees would trap insects on occasion… just as they do in the plum trees in our back yard.  When buried by soil and eventually rock substrate, and due to pressure over millions of years, the resin transforms into jewel-like amber, permanently encasing/preserving the (now extinct) species of insects that unfortunately had fallen into the resin.  

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.(Left click photo to enlarge; hit left return arrow to return back.)

The Spider & the Fly in Baltic Amber... by Thomas Peace 2013

The Spider & the Fly in Baltic Amber… by Thomas Peace 2013

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Whoever disenchants a single human soul…

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.     The whole of the universe is one… until you isolate part of it and tear it to pieces.  

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.     from Emily Dickinson:

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.     Whoever disenchants

.     A single Human soul

.     By failure of irreverence

.     Is guilty of the whole.

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.     As guileless as a Bird

.     As graphic as a Star

.     Till the suggestion sinister

.     Things are not what they are.   

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United we stand... by Thomas Peace 2013

United we stand… by Thomas Peace 2013

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If the instrument of the mind is distorted…

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.     If the instrument of the mind is distorted, then what it perceives will be false, twisted, misinterpreted, and pigeonholed with prejudice.

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.      from Blood Sweat, & Tears:

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.     What goes up must come down
spinning wheel got to go round
Talking about your troubles it’s a crying sin
Ride a painted pony
Let the spinning wheel spin

You got no money, and you, you got no home
Spinning wheel, spinning all alone
Talking about your troubles and you, you never learn
Ride a painted pony
let the spinning wheel turn

Did you find a directing sign
on the straight and narrow highway?
Would you mind a reflecting sign
Just let it shine within your mind
And show you the colours that are real

Would you mind a reflecting sign?(1)... by Thomas Peace 2013

Would you mind a reflecting sign?(1)… by Thomas Peace 2013

Would you mind a reflecting sign?(2)... by Thomas Peace 2013

Would you mind a reflecting sign?(2)… by Thomas Peace 2013

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Though this may be disquieting…

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.     Though this may be disquieting to a rather superficial, timid mind, it need not be:

There is not — though there certainly may seem to be — a true, central “controller” of thought; it (i.e., the “I” or the “me”) is just another thought; all thoughts are conditioned and all thoughts are limited reactions.  When thoughts — via an intelligence that is universal and not their own — (at certain times throughout the day) die to themselves (without the spurious effort of a fictitious central regulator)… then profound wisdom (in, and “as”, insightful silence) may flower.   Self deception — as the internal chicanery of the brain to itself — manifests easily, and this explains why innumerable minds often (unfortunately) blunder in the deceptiveness of control via a “central authority.”  Methods and  procedures (fabricated by a deceptive process) inevitably are a lack of true order and all such reactions (like a dog chasing its tail) inherently take time.  Reactions and time cannot create what is whole, truly blissful, and timeless.  Shadows cannot (and never will) manifest sunlight.   

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After the Big Bang... by Thomas Peace 2013

After the Big Bang… by Thomas Peace 2013

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If there is something fundamentally wrong with the way humans perceive…

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.     If (because of the way they were taught) there is something fundamentally wrong with the way humans perceive and mentally function… that would explain why there is so much disorder, indifference, pollution, and unabashed conflict in the world.

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Early to rise... by Thomas Peace 2013

Early to rise… by Thomas Peace 2013